Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) for Educators

If you're involved in education, it's likely that you've been hearing a lot about social and emotional learning (SEL) lately. It's seemingly everywhere these days. And while the goal of educating the "whole child" is not new, we know more about the impact of social and emotional skills on learning than ever before. We now know, for example, that social and emotional skills develop in direct connection to student academic learning1. In practice, this means that you are not forced to "choose" between SEL and academic instruction. Research has shown that students with SEL training "scored 13 points higher academically than their peers 3.5 years later, had 6 percent better high school graduation rates, and could even reap lifelong monetary benefits for their healthy adult lifestyle."2 The big takeaway? We now know that the time that a teacher spends working on SEL skill development is not time taken away from academic instruction; it is time that is spent laying the foundation for academic achievement and lifelong health.

Our team at the Friday Institute, along with a group of experts, researchers, and practitioners, developed this course with the goal of helping you build your own foundational understanding of how social and emotional learning (SEL) skills are essential to, and inseparable from, student learning. In doing so, you will build your own SEL skills, see examples of how others are teaching these skills, learn strategies to apply to your classroom, and share ideas with your colleagues in your school, your community, and around the globe. The course is designed to work in multiple ways: it complements existing district- and school-wide programs but can also be used in the absence of these programs to support educators in weaving SEL both explicitly and implicitly throughout academic instruction and the school day. The course is free for everyone and is intended to support self-directed adult learning. We want you to get out of it what you need.

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Source: CASEL

The course is organized in alignment with the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) framework for social emotional learning (see image). CASEL is a widely-recognized leader in the field of social and emotional learning, and we have been grateful for their involvement and support in the development of this course.

Feel free to review the course objectives and other information about the course, and we hope that you will enroll. We're thrilled to have the opportunity to learn alongside you.

Course Objectives

  • To provide educators with a foundational knowledge of SEL through the lens of the CASEL framework.
  • To build an understanding that SEL competencies are skills to be taught, not traits to be inherited.
  • To guide educators in building a repository of resources, activities, and skills to bring back to their classroom, school, and learning community.
  • To foster an understanding of the importance of educators' own SEL skills to developing the capacity to support students' SEL skills.
  • To provide educators with strategies to model and cultivate SEL competencies in interactions with peers, students, and families to help build SEL culture in their school.
  • To leave participating educators with an understanding of the importance of SEL competencies to the growth and development of justice-oriented, global citizens.

Learn More

  • Unit 1: Introduction to SEL
    Participants will begin to develop an understanding of CASEL's five core SEL competencies. They will begin to recognize that these competencies are skills that are learned rather than traits that are inherited, and they will learn and apply key instructional practices that support their students' SEL development. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What is the connection between SEL and learning?
    • What are the foundations of SEL?
    • What is the role of equity in teaching SEL?

  • Unit 2: Self-Awareness
    This unit focuses on the impact of self-awareness skills on educators' own lives as well as those of their students, emphasizing skills such as identifying emotions, having an accurate self-perception, recognizing strengths, possessing self-confidence, and demonstrating self-efficacy. Participants will explore self-awareness resources, strategies, and classroom examples and try out one strategy or lesson for themselves. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What skills does the self-awareness competency include? What is the relationship between self-awareness and a "growth mindset?"
    • How can educators use their strengths and challenges in this competency to benefit their interactions with students and/or peers? Why will self-awareness be important throughout students' lives?
    • How can educators explore self-awareness through an equity lens?

  • Unit 3: Self-Management
    This unit focuses on the impact of self-management skills on educators' own lives as well as those of their students, emphasizing skills such as impulse control, stress management, self-discipline, self-motivation, goal setting, and organizational skills. Participants will explore self-management resources, strategies, and classroom examples and try out one strategy or lesson for themselves. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What skills does the self-management competency include? How are they connected to executive function?
    • How can educators use their strengths and challenges in this competency to benefit their interactions with students and/or peers? Why will self-management be important throughout students' lives?
    • How can educators explore self-management through an equity lens?

  • Unit 4: Social Awareness
    This unit focuses on the impact of social awareness skills on educators' own lives as well as those of their students, emphasizing skills such as perspective-taking, empathy, appreciating diversity, and respect for others. Participants will explore social awareness resources, strategies, and classroom examples and try out one strategy or lesson for themselves. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What skills does the social awareness competency include? How are they connected to the concept of stereotype threat?
    • How can educators use their strengths and challenges in this competency to benefit their interactions with students and/or peers? Why will social awareness be important throughout students' lives?
    • How can educators explore social awareness through an equity lens?

  • Unit 5: Relationship Skills
    This unit focuses on the impact of relationship skills on educators' own lives as well as those of their students, emphasizing skills such as communication, relationship building, teamwork and cooperation, and managing conflict. Participants will explore relationship skills resources, strategies, and classroom examples and try out one strategy or lesson for themselves. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What skills does the relationship skills competency include? How might they better enable students to deal with peer pressure?
    • How can educators use their strengths and challenges in this competency to benefit their interactions with students and/or peers? Why will relationship skills be important throughout students' lives?
    • How can educators explore social awareness through an equity lens?

  • Unit 6: Responsible Decision-Making
    This unit focuses on the impact of responsible decision-making on educators' own lives as well as those of their students, emphasizing skills such as problem identification, situation analysis, problem solving, ethical responsibility, and evaluating and reflecting. Participants will explore responsible decision-making resources, strategies, and classroom examples and try out one strategy or lesson for themselves. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • What skills does the responsible decision-making competency include? How is the practice of "restorative justice" connected to responsible decision-making?
    • How can educators use their strengths and challenges in this competency to benefit their interactions with students and/or peers? Why will responsible decision-making be important throughout students' lives?
    • How can educators explore responsible decision-making through an equity lens?

  • Unit 7: Putting It All Together
    In prior units, participants built a body of knowledge of and strategies for addressing each of the five core SEL competencies. In this unit, we bring these competencies together to help participants think holistically about these skills and consider additional ways to apply them into the classroom and share more broadly. The essential questions for this unit are:
    • How are the five core SEL competencies connected? What can an understanding of these connections look like?
    • How can educators share their understanding of SEL more broadly in order to act as teacher leaders and influence the learning climate?
    • How can educators implement action plans and sustainably integrate SEL into their learning environments?

The people below are the primary authors of the course and will be present throughout to further discussion, answer questions, and learn with participants.

Alex Dreier

Alex Dreier

Alex Dreier is the Instructional Design Lead at the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at the NC State University's College of Education. His current work focuses on the instructional design, content development, and overall management of the Institute's MOOC-Ed initiative. Prior to joining the Institute, Alex managed the online training courses for EdTech Leaders Online, a nationally recognized online professional development organization housed at Education Development Center, Inc., in Waltham, MA. Among the courses that Alex helped update and maintain were "Meeting Student Needs Through Differentiated Instruction", "Technology, Teaching, and Universal Design", and "Transforming the Classroom with Project-Based Learning". He holds a B.A. in Psychology from Tulane University and an Ed.M. in Technology, Innovation, and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Christina Simmons

Christina Simmons

Christina Simmons has been supporting the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation with the content development of online courses for both educators and students since 2016. Currently an education consultant, her work focuses on the design and development of products and programs for educators and learners across Grades K–12, in and out of school settings and across subjects. Before launching an education consulting business, Ms. Simmons worked for fifteen years in K–12 educational publishing, including multiple, key roles in digital product and program development at National Geographic Education and content development for a variety of major basal and supplemental publishers. Ms. Simmons has a B.A. in English from Towson University, and an M.A. in English from DePaul University.

Mary Ann Wolf

Mary Ann Wolf

Mary Ann Wolf, Ph.D., has nearly 20 years of experience in education and has worked closely with federal, state, and local education leaders; policy-makers; and organizations on connecting policy and practice for innovative education reform, digital learning, and instructional practices. Mary Ann leads the Friday Institute's Professional Learning and Leading Collaborative (PLLC), that develops and facilitates face-to-face and blended opportunities for superintendents, district teams, principals, coaches, and teachers. Mary Ann has written extensively, including co-authoring her new book Leading Personalized and Digital Learning.

Mary Ann taught fifth grade in Virginia, studied education leadership with and conducted extensive research on teacher time and professionalism at the University of Virginia, and worked for KPMG Peat Marwick as a consultant for federally funded grant programs. Mary Ann has a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Virginia, an M.Ed. in Elementary Education from George Washington University, and a B.S. in Accounting and Marketing from Georgetown University.

Brittany Miller

Brittany Miller

Brittany Miller is a Digital Learning Coach for the Professional Learning and Leading Collaboration team at The William & Ida Friday Institute for Educational Innovation. She graduated Cum Laude with her Masters in Instructional Technology from North Carolina State University, where she also earned her BA in English Education. She holds a NC license in Secondary English Education, Middle Grades Language Arts, Technology Endorsement, and Instructional Technology, and has taught a range of high school courses from a literacy elective to AP English III. She publishes multimedia resources for teachers through social media professional learning networks to assist all levels of the education system through digital learning conversions.

Alison Graham

Alison Graham

Alison works on the Professional Learning and Leading Collaborative as a Competency Based Professional Learning Program Manager and as a project coordinator for the North Carolina Digital Leaders Coaching Network. Prior to joining the Friday Institute, Alison spent 14 years in the classroom at the elementary level. She is a National Board Certified Teacher and holds a Master of Arts in Teaching.

Darren Hudgins

Darren Hudgins

Darren Hudgins is the CEO of Think | Do | Thrive, co-author of Fact Vs. Fiction: Teaching Critical Thinking In The Age of Fake News, and a consultant for the Friday Institute. In both capacities, he works with educators, school leaders, districts and school organizations to help them build experiences that promote thought, play, and innovative strategies to strengthen their human capacity, drive action and inspire the souls of social servants. Learn more about his 20 plus years in education at about.me/darren_hudgins.

Lauren Acree

Lauren Acree

Lauren is a Research Associate at the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation, where she is the project manager of the Learning Differences MOOC-Ed, develops content for the State Leadership course for Digital Learning, and serves on a variety of teams for the Digital Learning Plan. Her professional interests center on education policy and scaling personalized, high-quality education for all students. Prior to joining the Friday Institute, Lauren got her Master of Public Policy from Duke University and taught Special Education as part of Teach for America in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Roxann Sykes

Roxann Sykes

Roxann Sykes has spent her entire educational career in the Wake County Public School System and she taught grades K-3 before pursing her career in adminstration. She has always thought outside of the box in order to meet students' needs. While teaching, Roxann established Camp S.Y.K.E.S in order to prevent summer learning loss for students and coordinated an afterschool program for students in South East Raleigh. She received her National Board Certification and her MSA from UNC Chapel Hill as a NC Principal Fellow. Roxann is currently in her last semester as a doctoral student, and her research on Social Emotional Learning is impacting her life in many ways. Roxann has a passion for equity and it has led to to her co-facilitating the district's first viewing and group discussion of the documentary, Teach Us All. Additionally she led a school's equity team and created a mentoring group for African American boys in grades 3-5 that was designed to support their SEL. Roxann was recognized as the 2018 NCASCD Outstanding Young Educator and selected as the 2018-2019 Assistant Principal of the Year for WCPSS. Most recently, Roxann has been named Principal at Dillard Drive Elementary School, and she looks forward to supporting students, teachers, and families as they soar to success.

Our team of experts provided core resources and interviews, and they continue to help support learners by answering questions and participating in discussions.

Michelle Accardi

Michelle Accardi

Michelle Accardi is a National Board Certified Teacher in Early Childhood through Young Adulthood/Exceptional Needs Specialist and the Director of Policy and Partnerships for the National Board. Prior to joining the staff of the National Board in 2011, she was an elementary school teacher in Albuquerque Public Schools. She achieved National Board certification in 2005 in Exceptional Needs. She worked in team-taught and self-contained classrooms with a focus on students with behavioral differences.

Jim Argent

Jim Argent

Dr. James Argent is passionate about developing leaders towards improved student outcomes through a focused effort on social-emotional learning, innovative teaching, and growth mindset. Dr. Argent has experience in working with at-promise and low-wealth schools to provide low-cost leadership coaching and development. He is currently an Executive Leadership Coach working with multiple schools and organizations.

Dr. Argent was a principal at the High School and Elementary School levels for 14 years. He received his Doctorate in Educational Leadership from East Carolina University and holds a Superintendent's License and a Principal's License in North Carolina. He received his Master in Education from North Carolina State University. During this time, he led an at-promise high school and has also led an elementary school through the implementation of the Leader In Me Program. Dr. Argent has also been an adjunct Faculty Member for North Carolina State University and has taught in the prestigious Northeast Leadership Academy through NCSU in the area of principal preparation.

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Shannon Bowman

Shannon Bowman is a Middle School Leadership teacher and Co-University Connections Liaison for Centennial Campus Magnet Middle School in Wake County. This is her 14th year in education and she has taught grades 3-6. She holds a B.S. in Elementary Education and Psychology from College at Brockport in upstate New York as well as a M.A. in Instructional Leadership from Towson University. Shannon's mission as an educator is to be an invested visionary of student success for all students. She is passionate about teaching the whole child and utilizes SEL strategies in her classrooms in order to do so.

Heather Boykin

Heather Boykin

Heather Boykin is the 3-5 Instructional Coach at Sherwood Park Elementary in Cumberland County, North Carolina. This is her 11th year in education and she has taught 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade. She holds a B.S. in Human Communication from Meredith College, and a M.A in Elementary Education from Arizona State University. Heather's professional interests center around helping students feel safe, loved, and capable of doing all things in education. She has spent the last few years learning about and implementing SEL in her classroom.

Michael DiMaggio

Michael DiMaggio

As an educator, coach, and lifelong learner, Michael DiMaggio values and understands how an SEL approach can benefit all kids. From his days teaching and coaching high school students, he adopted and embraced a process that focused on establishing positive relationships, demonstrating empathy, and helping young people make informed and healthy decisions. This philosophy continues at KnowledgeWorks whose focus on personalized competency based education underscores the importance of student agency and stresses how the system needs to be more responsive in better serving all students.

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Julie Edwards

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Sheila Evans

Sheila P. Evans has more than 30 years of experience in public education in North Carolina. She has served as a middle school teacher, a director, and a PreK-12 building level administrator. She currently serves as Principal at White Oak Elementary, a PreK-2 school, in Edenton, NC. Mrs. Evans is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill holding a Master of Arts in Teaching and received administration and supervision certifications from East Carolina University. She understands the importance of meeting students' social and emotional needs in order to teach them. Her work in SEL parallels her work in curriculum and instruction.

James Futrell

James Futrell

James Futrell has 15 years of educational experience as a high school teacher, counselor and principal. He is currently the Director of Student Services for Engagement and Access in Durham Public Schools. He is responsible for the implementation of Restorative Practices and other cultural frameworks designed to teach the Social and Emotional Learning competencies in 53 schools serving over 32,000 students. He also supports the implementation of Social and Emotional Learning curriculum in elementary schools across the district using Second Step, Zones of Regulation and Move this World. James has shared the responsibility of designing lessons for Ninth Grade Academy teachers to facilitate teaching the SEL competencies for students transitioning to high school and has helped to form an advisory structure for all students based on the strong student and adult relationships.

Bethiel Holton

Bethiel Girma Holton

Bethiel Girma Holton is a Program Officer for the Learning Differences Program at Oak Foundation. In this role, she manages a USD 15 million portfolio of grants supporting youth leadership development, mentoring, parent support, and research and innovation with the goal of promoting the academic, social and emotional success of students with learning differences such as dyslexia. Prior to joining Oak, Bethiel was the National Director of Student Engagement at City Year, an education non-profit that partners with teachers and schools to help prepare students with the skills and mindsets to thrive. In this role she led the design, implementation and evaluation of research-based school culture, social emotional learning and after-school programs in over 250 schools in 26 cities.

Lindsay Kruse

Lindsay Kruse

Lindsay Kruse is the vice president of Understood's Educator Program, where she leads the team responsible for ensuring that every child has a teacher who is prepared, confident, and able to help them thrive in school and beyond. She comes to this work after more than fifteen years building programs to address and support educators in reaching full equity and opportunity in schools. Most recently, she served as the managing director of the Leverage Leadership Institute for the Relay Graduate School of Education, where she helped design and launch a program for top principals and superintendents across the country to diversify proof points and create a larger bench of leaders who can develop others to drive strong instruction. She is a graduate of the Broad Residency in Urban Education, a two-year management development program that trains graduates of business, public policy, and law schools for leadership positions in school districts. Kruse received her bachelor's degree in Communication from Cornell University and an MBA from Columbia Business School with a concentration in social enterprise. As a parent of two children with learning and thinking differences and a leader of the Princeton Public Schools Special Education parent organization, she comes to this work with a strong belief in the value of partnership, advocacy, and support for families, educators, and students.

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Clark McKown

Clark McKown is an award-winning social scientist and a leading expert on SEL assessments. In his role as a university faculty member, Clark has been the lead scientist on several large grants supporting the development and validation of SELweb, Networker, and other assessment systems. Clark is passionate about creating usable, feasible, and scientifically sound tools that help educators and their students. xSEL Labs is the embodiment of that passion.

Susanne Nobles

Susanne Nobles

Susanne has spent her career working to empower educators and students with research, structures, and tools for truly meaningful learning. Currently, she is the Senior Director of Teaching and Learning at the nonprofit ReadWorks where she leads their work on supporting teachers with free research-based best practices and resources for developing joyful, confident readers. Susanne also is an adjunct instructor with Relay Graduate School of Education, helping early career teachers deepen their practice. Prior to joining ReadWorks, Susanne led Digital Promise's collaborative work with developers, researchers, and educators for the Learner Variability Project, highlighting the research on how social and emotional learning underpins all learning. Susanne also worked as a high school teacher and administrator for more than 20 years, including developing advising programs to support students' whole selves. She earned her Ph.D. in Composition and New Media from Old Dominion University, focusing her research on creating effective digital communities of practice; her M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Virginia Commonwealth University; and her A.B. in English with Teacher Certification from Duke University.

Adrian Perry

Adrian Perry

Adrian Perry is the principal of Rocky River Elementary School in Cabarrus County, North Carolina. She is in her 5th year as principal of Rocky River Elementary School, a school that focuses on educating the whole child (social emotionally and academically) through innovative practices such as sensory integration, mindfulness, and full implementation of their own Rocky River Social Emotional Curriculum, which was written by Rocky River teachers and staff using a variety of data in order to meet the various needs of their students and is integrated daily into morning meetings across the school. Adrian has a true passion for educating students and ensuring the success of every child both academically and social emotionally.

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Carrie Phillips

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Amy Rickard

Amy Rickard has been the principal of Morris Grove Elementary School since it opened in 2008. She has worked in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools since 1999, having served as the Principal at Glenwood Elementary School and as an Assistant Principal at Rashkis Elementary and McDougle Elementary. Ms. Rickard holds a B.A. in English Education and Psychology and an M.A. in School Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ms. Rickard has been honored as the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Principal of the Year in 2007 and 2013. In 2014, she was named the Wells Fargo Piedmont-Triad/Central Regional Principal of the Year as well as the North Carolina National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP.)

Justina Schlund

Justina Schlund

Justina Schlund oversees efforts to translate essential learning from the field into resources and professional development that supports systemic SEL implementation. She also supervises the development and continuous refinement of key CASEL products that provide research-informed and field-tested guidance to districts and schools, including the CASEL Guide to Schoolwide SEL and the District Resource Center. Prior to joining CASEL, Justina was the executive director of Chicago Public School's Office of Social and Emotional Learning, where she led districtwide improvement strategies to foster supportive learning environments that promote the social and emotional development of all students.

Heather Schwartz

Heather Schwartz

As a Practice Specialist at CASEL, Heather helps to translate essential learning from the field into resources and professional development that support systemic SEL implementation. Before coming to CASEL, Heather worked as an instructional coach on Chicago's southwest side. In this role she worked directly with teachers to help them create intellectually active and engaging learning experiences for students. She also worked with schools' leadership teams to conceive of and implement improvements to school culture. Heather completed a master's degree in educational leadership at Columbia University Teachers College, along with degrees from Oberlin and Northwestern. She aspires to contribute to a more just society by supporting SEL in schools.

Kirk Ziemke

Kirk Ziemke

Co-Founder of CARE Student Wellness and Restore Student Behavior, Kirk creates curricula and tools that target the development of social and emotional skills in young people. A former high school teacher and head swimming coach, Kirk currently works as a Student Wellness Specialist with The Big Shoulders Fund. In 2019, Kirk has been a featured speaker at IntegratED Portland, The White Family Scholarship Reception, and The Friday Institute SEL Convening at North Carolina State University. Kirk fosters a holistic approach to wellness by helping young people develop awareness of social, emotional, and physical health. He collaborates with universities, researchers, and educational organizations across the country to rethink and refine approaches to wellness for students, athletes and educators. Kirk develops curricula and tools to deliver curricula that streamline implementation and data collection, making wellness practice a simple, ongoing, and effective habit of everyday life.

The people below are a big part of the reason this course can even exist. They set up the technology, systems, and media for the MOOC-Ed.

Meghan Day

Meghan Day

Meghan manages the online learning content and provides technical support for the MOOC-Ed platform at the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at NC State University.

Jim Haverkamp

Jim Haverkamp

Jim Haverkamp is a filmmaker and freelance video editor based in Durham, NC. He also teaches for Duke University's film and documentary studies departments. His work can be seen online at jimhaverkamp.com.

Mark Samberg

Mark Samberg

Mark Samberg joined the Friday Institute in May of 2013. As Technology Innovation Lead, Mark works with the project teams to identify, select, and implement technology solutions into the work of the teams across the Institute. Prior to joining the FI, Mark was the Chief Technology Officer for Bertie County Schools, an Instructional Technology Specialist in Currituck County Schools and Hertford County schools, and a math teacher and the designer/developer of the SAM/SPAN applications in Wake County Schools. Mark has completed the Certified Educational Chief Technology Officer program through the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, holds B.S. degrees in Mathematics Education and Computer Science from NC State University, and a Master of Instructional Technology from East Carolina University.

Heather Bronson

Heather Bronson

In her role as Senior Communications Manager for the Friday Institute, Heather builds nationwide awareness of the Friday Institute's work, programming and initiatives among key stakeholders and the general public in order to establish the organization as the center for collaboration and innovation of education research, practice and policy. She previously led communications, marketing, and public and media relations efforts for the Chicago Literacy Alliance, a nonprofit association of literacy programs and organizations. Heather has worked as a marketer, editor and writer since 2007 when she graduated with a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Blythe Tyrone

Blythe Tyrone

Blythe Tyrone is a Program Manager at the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation. She oversees the implementation of all MOOC-Eds and was a member of the development team for the first MOOC-Ed, Digital Learning Transitions. Previously she served as the lead Communications Specialist for the Friday Institute. She holds an M.S. in Communication from NC State University.

Participants will have the opportunity to earn a certificate of completion for 25 hours of professional development during the Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) for Educators MOOC-­Ed. In order to earn a certificate, participants must:

  • As part of the registration process, complete an initial survey about your background, organization, and goals for taking the SEL MOOC-Ed.
  • Complete self-assessments for each SEL competency in Units 2-6.
  • Identify and engage with resources that best support self-assessment results and learning needs.
  • Contribute to the SEL MOOC-Ed by asking questions, responding to others' questions, and sharing ideas in the discussion forums; agreeing with or identifying comments as insightful; suggesting resources that will be useful to others; and sharing your expertise in other ways. A certificate of completion requires participation in at least one discussion per unit.
  • Develop and submit an SEL Action Plan.
  • Provide meaningful feedback to one or more of your colleagues' SEL Action Plan reflections.
  • Complete a final survey at the end of the MOOC-Ed and provide suggestions for improving it in the future.

You can submit the certificate to your local agency with a request for CEUs. Granting of CEUs will be subject to the policies and procedures of your state and local agency.

MOOC-Eds provide a scalable, accessible, and flexible approach that is aligned with the principles of effective professional learning. Our approach is grounded in authentic, active, and collaborative professional learning activities. The approach builds upon the following key design principles:

  • Self-directed learning, through personalizing your experience by identifying your own goals, selecting among a rich array of resources, and deciding whether, when, and how to engage in discussions and activities to further your own learning and meet your goals.
  • Peer-supported learning, through engaging in online discussions, reviewing your colleagues' projects, rating posted ideas, recommending resources, crowdsourcing lessons learned, and participating in other exchanges appropriate to the individual course.
  • Job-embedded learning, through the use of case studies, classroom and school related projects; developing action plans; and other activities that center your work on critical problems of practice and data-informed decision-making in your own classrooms, schools or districts.
  • Multiple voices, through learning about the perspectives of other teachers and administrators along with those of students, researchers and experts in the field. Our courses are purposefully not designed around one or two experts who present online lectures. They provide exposure to a rich set of perspectives presented within the context of course elements that reflect these core principles.

You will see these design principles implemented in our courses through the following instructional elements:

  • Conceptual Frameworks
  • Resource Collections
  • Asynchronous Discussions
  • Student Stories
  • Expert Voices
  • Participant Projects and Peer Feedback
  • Crowd-sourcing
  • Professional Learning Community (PLC) Guides
Start Date 10/01/2019
Duration 7 units
Cost Free
Primary Audience Elementary School Teachers
Middle School Teachers
High School Teachers
School Counselors
Instructional Coaches
Instructional Support Teams
Administrators
Certificate Available Yes
Certificate Hours 25
Certificate Requirements Due 12/13/2019
Registration Closes 11/15/2019
Developed By Professional Learning & Leading Collaborative (PLLC) @ Friday Institute
Facilitated By Professional Learning & Leading Collaborative (PLLC) @ Friday Institute
Additional Hours 2.5 per micro-credential